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Ivo kitchen paring knives

Posted by Luisknivacc 
Ivo kitchen paring knives
November 01, 2014 07:40AM
Right about the time that Cliff started his experiments/ work with Joe's paring knife, he showed some other blades along with it, and one of those was the portuguese produced Ivo paring knife. I found it odd that it would end up across the Atlantic, as I know that there are quite a few portuguese immigrants in Canada but I wouldn't have expected a knife from a somewhat recent line of paring knives to end up lost in a canadian construction site. Cliff mentioned the knife as a nice example of a production parer, and because I can get it at many supermarkets for very cheap (well, you could get 3 Chef's Essentials, but c'mon guys), I ended up getting one. Heck, I ended up liking it so much I've given 4 as gifts, and have them in 4 different varietes of colours (red, green, black and a brown one with a cork based handle rather than plastic). They make them in a wharncliff variety and in a serrated version (albeit this one is more rare, I had to go to the expensive mall to find one). The serrated version is quite nice, relatively wide and even scallops, chisel ground for right sided use, unlike what is the standard I've seen of left-hand chisel grinds.

In the 9 months since I've started using them I can definitely say I really like them. The steel is 55cr14MoV, and from what I've read of portuguese websites/ asked to knifemakers in the region it's made, it's around 55-56hrc. The grindability on these is extremely high, it takes me two and a half to three minutes to fully sharpen one after de-stressing. This has much to do with the very small thickness behind the edge, this varies as they are power-sharpened and if the person sharpening them leans in too much or does it unevenly ( one I bought had the right side bevel almost at the same angle as the primary grind) the knife will thicken up, but they come as lean as around 0.005" (0.13mm) thick behind the edge on average (I'll put the metric in parenthesis now, as the forum seems to very much prefer the imperial system), and as thick as 0.008" (0.21mm). Blade thickness in 0.050" (1.28mm).

The steel and edge thickness make sharpening extremely quick, and the steel isn't very prone to forming a burr. This is after a minute and a half on a coarse DMT plate (300 grit) The push-cutting sharpness is more accurate if I take more time but I was rishing here, I realise after watching it that my first attempt at a push-cut was nothing of the sort. My usual finish is on a 15dps micro-bevel on a 10dps bevel, and then it can true-push cut. Also, you can't see it shaving on my pasty skin very well, but it does.

The handles are mostly made from injection molded plastic, the exception to this being the marginally more expensive line made with cork based handles. Following our economic crisis ( all you'll read about if you google portuguese current events), industries have been looking into using national materials for other uses, and one of them is cork, as we export around 50% of the world total. Cork has begun seeing use in fashion accessories, clothing, office materials and sound insulation and now in knife handles. It's not much heavier than the plastic and it has a feeling of slightly more grip to it than the plastic..

Overall, I really like them. Having so many around has led to my family using them with reckless abandon, so they see lots of cutting on glass or ceramic, sometimes get thrown in the dishwasher, etc. so I have come to really appreciate the practice of micro-beveling.
Re: Ivo kitchen paring knives
November 11, 2014 02:11PM
I'd never seen a knife handle made with cork before. I presume that's what I'm looking at in the picture of the Wharncliff one? Is the cork processed in some way to make it more durable?

I've just looked around on Google and saw quite a few knives made out of what appear to be genuine wine bottle corks, quite a nice idea for a novelty.
Re: Ivo kitchen paring knives
November 11, 2014 03:16PM
Quote
AdamJ
I'd never seen a knife handle made with cork before. I presume that's what I'm looking at in the picture of the Wharncliff one? Is the cork processed in some way to make it more durable?

I've just looked around on Google and saw quite a few knives made out of what appear to be genuine wine bottle corks, quite a nice idea for a novelty.

They've got two types of cork based handles, the ones in the recent lines, which are more like a cork overlay to the handle, as in the one pictured, and an older line of far more expensive knives in which they use the cork more purely and in a more exclusive line. This is a google translate of the expensive vegetable knife. Mind you, the word line (as in, a line of products) is translated as row and handle is translated as cable, which might give you some confusion.

As for the one I showed (yes, the wharncliff), even though the knife does have elements of cork in it, I can't tell how much. Neither the company's website nor local websites show anything relevant. I feel there is added grip, but in the interest of being crystal clear I may have confirmation bias here as I expected it to be, and it might not be the case after all - I do not feel it to be drastically grippier.
Re: Ivo kitchen paring knives
November 11, 2014 03:27PM
Wnease has a knife he made with a cork handle, he has been carrying it for a long time and the cork has held up really well (at least the last time I saw it). He uses it as an EDC I believe.

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Re: Ivo kitchen paring knives
November 12, 2014 01:56PM
Quote
Luisknivacc
As for the one I showed (yes, the wharncliff), even though the knife does have elements of cork in it, I can't tell how much. Neither the company's website nor local websites show anything relevant.

It does look strange. Sort of natural looking due to the flecks, but not like any cork I've seen.

Quote
Mark a
Wnease has a knife he made with a cork handle, he has been carrying it for a long time and the cork has held up really well (at least the last time I saw it). He uses it as an EDC I believe.

Interesting, I would have guessed the cork would get mangled quite quickly. I'm quite tempted to get a tiny blade blank and stick it into a wine cork. You've got to start somewhere.
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