Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 01:20AM
Fellas,

After working with machetes for brush clearing and moderate sized trees of about 4” to 5” or smaller, I don’t see a reason for me to carry something in the ESEE Junglas or Busse Battle Mistress class of ~ 10” large knives. A machete is optimal for brush, an axe is optimal for trees. The 10” knives might be a solid do-all blade for chopping but I’d rather have the optimal tool.

In using small fixed blades and folders for light/low-stress cutting, I don’t see any reason to have a 5” to 6” fixed blade that’s only for that work.

What I do see a need for is a 5” to 6” fixed blade that offers extremely high lateral and tip strength, while also having acceptable cutting ability for woodwork and food processing. Essentially a highly durable knife that is a one-tool option, ideally accompanied by a machete or axe but possible to use for wood harvesting in absence of one.

This would be something that is a constant companion, carried everywhere and supplemented with larger or smaller cutting tools as needed.



Specific requirements for this class of knife:

- Extreme lateral and tip strength (digging and prying in woods)

- Cutting ability is high enough to still be a knife, not a sharpened pry-bar

- about a ~6” blade length

- Preferably stainless steel

- Preferably low carbide/high toughness steel

- Leather sheath

- Edge that’s very close to the handle for high-force cutting



In thinking about this, two knives come to mind: the ESEE 6 and the Fallkniven A1.


While the ESEE 6 has the required durability and versatility:












It is not entirely optimal for four reasons:

- The second video demonstrates that while it does have a lot of durability, it’s not stiff enough to actually pry apart and dig in woods that aren’t rotten or at least very soft.

- It’s not stainless (only a minor issue)

- The sheath would need to be replaced with a leather one right away, adding about $100 to the cost which brings it up to the ~ $250 of the Fallkniven

- The edge sits out from the handle a bit farther than I’d like it to



The Fallkniven A1, on the other hand, has only one single downside or flaw that I can see:

- The VG-10 core of the laminate blade.


The VG-10 would be fine for most work and the blade as a whole would have very good corrosion resistance as compared to the ESEE, but the big problem is how it’s likely to take damage. It’s very likely to chip and fracture, and has fairly low grindability.

The ESEE 1095, in contrast, has been proven to not fracture or chip, even under direct and heavy chops into rocks. It just gets some impaction or rolling, and the high grindability makes any damage much easier to grind out.



So my two questions are this:

- If the Fallkniven A1 has only that one downside of the VG-10 being prone to fracture/chipping, do the rest of its attributes being directly in line with requirements outweigh that one downside?

- Are there other knives available that have the same attributes as the A1, but with a more sensible steel choice? If so, what are they?


What do you guys think?
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 02:38AM
Ryan,
I have a few 5"-6" blades, but I really haven't had a chance to wring them out in the field. Have you thought of trying out a 6" Mora? I think you can get a leather shealth for one for not that much extra.

"I am still discussing issues of steels and performance at this stage." -- Cliff Stamp, May his memory be a blessing
"Life is GOOD", -- Stefan_Wolf, May His Memory Be A Blessing
WordPress YouTube Facebook Patreon Locals Instagram Twitter
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 03:22AM
Quote
jasonstone20
Have you thought of trying out a 6" Mora?

Not enough lateral stiffness. I want something that’s stiff enough so that I can hammer the point into a tree and do a pull-up on it.
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 03:46AM
Ryan,
What about a Robust or a Craftline HD?
Or a Mora Garberg (0.13"winking smiley or Bushcarft (.125"winking smiley?

[survivorsfortress.com]

"I am still discussing issues of steels and performance at this stage." -- Cliff Stamp, May his memory be a blessing
"Life is GOOD", -- Stefan_Wolf, May His Memory Be A Blessing
WordPress YouTube Facebook Patreon Locals Instagram Twitter



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/05/2020 03:51AM by jasonstone20.
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 04:31AM
Nope, not stiff enough. The Fallkniven is almost twice as thick as those Moras, meaning the A1 would take roughly eight times the lateral load to bend the same amount as the Mora.

So if the A1 is considered optimal here, the Mora would be not even remotely close in performance.
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 06:24AM
How about a KaBar or Ontario if you don't want to go with the Esee? I didn't realize the Falkniven A1 was that thick.

"I am still discussing issues of steels and performance at this stage." -- Cliff Stamp, May his memory be a blessing
"Life is GOOD", -- Stefan_Wolf, May His Memory Be A Blessing
WordPress YouTube Facebook Patreon Locals Instagram Twitter
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 10:42AM
what you need is a 1/4" stock, with a zero grind sabre and a primary of around 6-7 degrees, and a micro bevel, with the tip left thick.

the A1 is a knife i hated.. the handle in my size hand was terrible, and small.. medium hands IMO

I've not liked a single fallkniven i've touched because of the handlers.

the cold steel recon scout with a reprofile sounds exactly like what you want based on one id did exactly that to.. it was a fantastic knife

i replaced the handle also for chopping. these used to be a cheap affordable knife..






looking at my own knife designs. this one is sort of like what you are describing. i pretty much designed it for exactly what you are saying





something like a busse with a regrind sounds like a good option too. but expensive as heck..

----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 11:38AM
My perspective on what Ryan said.

in a NZ climate, i agree. the 10" blades like my forrester xxl, and busse etc serve no purpose.. the main purpose I've been told of their value are people living/camping in forrests, not bush, that have a lot of dead fall or hard wood where the 10" blade makes a good wood splitter.. i guess there is just also a desire to have a nice big cool blade.

I would still think a hatchet and a cooking knife a better option, but they are also heavier..

in NZ, its all bush.. so a machete is the most ideal knife to carry.. because there is gorse and bush everywhere.. not only do you want to cut it down easily with low energy cost, but you want to do it from a distance.
Unitl i got into knives in an international way, i'd never even seen knives as thick as bark river and others do.. its unheard of.. Svord NZ and most knife makers etc will do blades in the 2-2.5mm size for most blades 6" and down.. they cut well.. they are not used for splitting.. they are used for cutting.. so they all work well for food prep and hunting.

but we have completely different needs here in a bush like environment.


a nessmuk trio seems like a good option, but in NZ switch out axe for machete.




Ryan - whats the need for digging and prying into wood? just curious to expand on the need.

Rather than stainless, can go for something like calmax that doesn't rust easily..
the APFK i showed above uses an unheard of Bohler steel which is kind of like 440B with vanadiam.. stainless but very tough, easy edge.. too rare to buy a knife out of it.

it would be really interesting to see how a CRK pacific would handle your requirements grinning smiley

a nessmuk style pattern might be suitable for you to get a high grind for food cutting, and a stout spearpoint tip left thick


----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 11:40AM
Ryan. if the CS outdoorsman had leather, do you think it meets your criteria?

----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 11:44AM




id grab one of these in a heart beat if i needed one grinning smiley

----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 01:02PM




only real user review i can find









----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 04/05/2020 01:20PM by cKc.
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 01:50PM




funny review, making a little bit of fun of table top reviewers with untouched knives.. but it does seem like a nice 6" blade.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 03:04PM
Kyley,
Were I live, in the Temperate Rain Forests of the Pacific Northwest, we have both types of terrain, forest and bush.
Since we have a huge Himalayan blackberry problem, I can either use a thicker machete and smaller blade, or hachet/axe and smaller blade, or my favorite, combination machete, axe, large knife and small folder. Last time I went camping, took my 12" Cold Steel LTC and my 9.5 Ontario Marine Raider bowie, along with a Leatherman Wave and a Benchmade Pika. We were right on were the treeline ended, in a prairie right next to a valley and at were the glaciers were, so there was a ton of dead fall. It was summer so all the prairie flowers were in bloom, and were were up about 5k+ at least, if not more from sea-level, so there was a beautiful view. Right up on the Pacific Crest Trail. The only thing that wasn't fun is that there were tons of mosquito's, so many in looked like little rivers in the air when the wind would blow them.

"I am still discussing issues of steels and performance at this stage." -- Cliff Stamp, May his memory be a blessing
"Life is GOOD", -- Stefan_Wolf, May His Memory Be A Blessing
WordPress YouTube Facebook Patreon Locals Instagram Twitter
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 03:17PM
Quote
cKc
what you need is a 1/4" stock, with a zero grind sabre and a primary of around 6-7 degrees, and a micro bevel, with the tip left thick.


Basically, yes, and it’s been surprisingly difficult to find that.

The Outdoorsman is fairly close but it’s a bit too thin of stock and I’ve thinned out the tip so much that I would be pretty dubious it would have the strength required. It’s a solid knife and I think it’s near-optimal (at least after the re-grind) for game processing or camp cooking, but it’s not quite stiff enough and I suspect the tip is too weak as well.


That level of stiffness and strength (hammer the point into a tree, do a pull-up off thre handle) is something I want/need for a few reasons:

- If the knife is small enough to lack any significant chopping ability, then a stiff knife can be used to pry apart, baton through, and dig with the point, in order to obtain dry wood in wet environments. If it’s been raining or snowing, it’s often necessary to break away the wet outer wood, which can be quite difficult if the knife isn’t stiff enough.

- If it’s that stiff, it’s not very likely that I’d be able to break it in use. Basically just ensuring longevity because the leverage required to break it is higher than the actual force I can apply.

- In looking at my current equipment, I don’t have anything like that. It’s a functional gap in my arsenal.


Quote
cKc
the A1 is a knife i hated.. the handle in my size hand was terrible, and small.. medium hands IMO

Well that’s not encouraging haha but are ya sure it was the A1? I’ve written off the S1 (and the other, even smaller ones) for exactly that reason, the handles are simply too small. But the A1 is actually not small in comparison, it’s somewhat larger than (for example) the Cold Steel SRK/Recon Tanto/Master Hunter handle.
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 03:43PM
I have large/xl hands and the A1 was a super stout knife, but the handle just felt small and I have never liked rubberised handles.. they just feel bad to me.. so bad for me might be perfectly good for you.

If you want to use the knife to smack into wood and climb on.. then i think a spring steel is the option to go for.. No idea the reason you want to..


I think i might personally take a different tact.. but i dont live where you guys live so who knows.. but is part of the decision making a weigth limitation issue on the gear? or just not taking more than is needed?

I'd personally go for a mini hatchet for wood processing. Gransfors mini, and then get a 6" very thin blade like a svord or victory outdoorsman (excellent knife) which is ground like a kitchen knife.. for drilling etc.. i'd actually go for an overly stout palm knife with a 2" blade for carving and drilling and wood working. then pair these up with the machete or larger axe..

cool video








XL handle on this.. im thinking like my micro hiker size with Spanto Tip. lol




----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 03:58PM
Quote
cKc
... is part of the decision making a weigth limitation issue on the gear? or just not taking more than is needed?


It’s under the assumption that I don’t have either a machete or an axe with me to deal with the larger wood cutting. And the knife can’t be too large because it’ll be unlikely to get carried and be a bit too big for game processing, too.


The idea is that while it would be optimal to have something like a small/medium folder, the A1 (or similar), and an axe or machete, it would be of some significant value to have a single tool (that’s reasonable to carry) that can do the necessary work.
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 04:16PM
What significant value to only have one? Not disagreeing, just trying to get to the intent and reasoning.

I personally would opt for more than one in case something happens to one of them, I still at least have something else.

if the idea is no big axe or machete, then I think I'd favour the mini hatchet and a thin kitchen knife over a prybar knife.

as much as I hate to reccomend them.. the Bark River Bravo 1.5 is a very good approximation of what you are after in terms of thickness, robustness, size, durable grind.. efficient cutting etc etc..



I'm the type of person that says.. always have a swiss army knife.. they are not heavy, and invaluable backups.. why not have a tiny neck knife.. its not that big and you can forget it exists grinning smiley, take a outdoor version of the kitchen knife, why make the food prep harder than it needs to be. if i need to split wood.. the mini hatchet is super versatile, and can happily be used like a kitchen knife and a chinese cleaver as well as batonning and splitting wood.

i guess im just never a fan of take one tool that will be less than ideal at everything when i can for a similar weight break it down into multiple tools..

but that doesn't mean I wont try and find you the knife that fits the criteria.. lol

----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 04:22PM
i found you the knife Ryan, grinning smiley grinning smiley




----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 05:58PM
Hmmm. Maybe you’re right, Kylie. Maybe it’s a fruitless endeavor.

I see obvious utility in a one-tool option, especially one that’s very compact like the A1 is, but maybe it’s just not sensible to get one when I already have knives or choppers/axes that would outperform it and are still not particularly difficult to carry or pack along.

I mean I’ve already got several knives that are close to optimal for light to moderate cutting, stuff like wood carving and food/game preparation, so maybe it’s more sensible to make sure I’ve got either a hatchet or a machete or a big chopper in addition to whatever light knife I happen to have on me.

The A1 is still tempting, but maybe it’s not sensible compared to a multi-tool approach.
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 06:12PM
I wish I still had my videos of the A1.. I can see from my email history portions of comments and things in regards to the A1 that jogged my memory about it, but what I ended up doing was ripping off the rubber handle, and custom made a new handle for it, that was a little longer. basically the same thing i did to that recon scout, but in proportion to the knife..

i also tested it pretty hard, and thinned the profile down. from what i read and remember, once i switched the handle i was very happy with the performance, but it was too thick a knife and i thinned it down. there was too much meat behind the edge.

After thinning, most of the laminate was gone and high up the blade meaning that the edge steel was now the one taking any and all impacts.. i didn't get any chipping or damage though in my testing. i suspect the failures come from ebedded dirt and stones in wood being chopped.

but it tells me the laminate centre is too thick.. you really want that centre core to be as thin as possible so that its just the edge and nothing else. the problem is, and i've seen it in other laminates.. they weld and then roll to thickness, and its not even.. so if they make the core too thin, it might end up too much off centre for an knife and you grind into some soft edge.


I really think that if you try a 6" thin blade like that victory knife or a svord as your camp knife and try one of the mini axes if its in your budget you will like it grinning smiley

my first quality knife was actually a svord deluxe skinner.. 2mm thick l6.. i used it for all camping chores, food prep, filleting and skinning fish.. te abuse i put my ckc belt knives through testing them was insane.. batonning with full size hammers etc.. thin doesn't mean weak.. but it does mean it doesn't split wood well, hence the hatchet

----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 05, 2020 06:20PM
[photos.app.goo.gl]

these are my hatchets.. i wouldnt recommend the wetterlings, as its more of a small primary.. the other 2 are amazing light weight tools being a gransfors mini and a custom lee reeves

[www.arizonacustomknives.com]

absolutely stunning.. i recommend you buy one immediately even if just as a collector.. its 3 layer, being 1018 for the most with the 180 edge welded in between..
Also.. his sheath is a work of art itself.. goes though the belt tomahawk style where you flip the lip and lift it out.. makes it weightless on the belt.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 09, 2020 04:36AM
Those Reeves axes definitely look very nice.



Here’s a valid use case for a knife that’s got extreme strength/stiffness:







Not something you’d do if you’ve got better tools available, but it would be better than freezing to death if the 5 is all you’ve got to work with. I also think that the 5 would be something that might do well if stored in a vehicle, it gives the ability to break out a window and/or lever open a door in the event of an accident.
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 09, 2020 06:54AM
i think 6.5-7" is a good do all size.. its nice technique he used to get around a big log with a small knife, but how are you going to get the big log if you only have the small knife? you'll be foraging for smalller pieces i suspect.

im not sure why you'd even risk the knife. make a couple of wooden wedges and be done.. use the knife just to make the gap for the wedge to get in.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 09, 2020 07:16AM
Quote
cKc
its nice technique he used to get around a big log with a small knife, but how are you going to get the big log if you only have the small knife?

Ha! I hadn’t even thought of that. Kinda undercuts the entire use case. It really would be rare to come across pre-sawn rounds out in the wilderness. spinning smiley sticking its tongue out


Quote
cKc
make a couple of wooden wedges and be done.. use the knife just to make the gap for the wedge to get in.

That’s probably going to be significantly more efficient, no doubt about that.



What you mentioned about that custom axe, that did really get me thinking. I think would make a lot of sense to get a quality hardwood pattern small axe, something to compare directly to the Fiskars X7, the Condor Golok, and the Junglas. I might have to find one.
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 09, 2020 07:28AM
On the subject of axes, I’ve been considering getting a Gransfors American Felling axe, 3lb head on a 35” handle. I believe my current skill level with the 24” limbing axe is high enough that I’d actually gain something by the massive increase in power, but I’m not sure if I actually need that level of power because I very rarely have to go through diameters above 14” or so. And even when I do, it’s generally only one or two cuts, just enough to make it easier to move the logs.

It’s interesting to think about though, the power of a 2lb hardwood pattern head on a 24” handle is already very high, I can’t imagine what a 50% increase in length and weight would do.
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 09, 2020 09:32AM
i have no experience with anything except hatchets.. tree felling isn't big where im from.

as far as hatchets.. I bought a fiskers.. its more of a small splitting mault than a cutting tool imo.. its performance in cutting is terrible purely because of the edge grind and cross section.. i guess putting it on a belt grinder would fix that and then it would be a fery durable tool.

what i really hated about it is the hollow handle.. Spiders keep climbing in there.. need to pack it with a piece of cork. lol

i have the Wetterling small hatchet.. a little cheaper than the gransfors and almost identical imo.. a little thicker head.. but it really does cut nicely.

with the really small ones if you want to chop, you end up having to power through the cut like a knife, and risk damaging the head. i watched a friends video the other day where this snapped a piece off the head. it was replaced under warranty, and it may have been faulty, but i can see how it broke and it wouldn't have if the head was doing the work rather than the body.

Quote
Ryan

It’s interesting to think about though, the power of a 2lb hardwood pattern head on a 24” handle is already very high, I can’t imagine what a 50% increase in length and weight would do.

i dont know, but you prob need a good level of fitness grinning smiley

----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 09, 2020 10:10AM
Quote
cKc
tree felling isn't big where im from.

Around here, Wisconsin, there’s not much commercial logging anymore. And what is done privately by landowners is almost entirely done by chainsaw.


Quote
cKc
I bought a fiskers.. its more of a small splitting mault than a cutting tool imo..

Yeah the Fiskars is a soft wood pattern, that’s why it’s so wedge-shaped and obtuse. The Browning limbing axe I have is a hardwood pattern, far thinner behind the edge. I haven’t used the Fiskars yet on local woods but it’s not likely to be optimal for it.

The hard vs soft wood issue is something that has proven to be pretty difficult for me. Locally it’s almost entirely hardwood tree species, conifers are not very common. I basically need high-performance blades and axes with lean primary grinds or I get very little penetration in anything but green/young trees. Chopping something like dead oak or maple is an entirely different ballgame from fresh-cut white pine.



I found this, a new management team on an older brand:

[www.americantomahawk.com]


The Nylon handled model looks like a solid tool to me, good for light chopping, general woodwork, and bear defense.

I sent them an email after struggling to find much info, they’re so new. I basically asked if it’s intended to be a solid, durable, real woods tool or if it’s more of a showpiece for mall ninjas. We’ll see what they say.
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 09, 2020 10:27AM
a flat head tomakawk isn't going to penetrate well compared to a nice curved axe head which localized the power to a smaller point on the edge on impact... i can think of no reason except looks to do that vs a moon cresent edge. i dont think you'd ever see that on an authentic hawk.. it would bounce off armour rather than biting in. so good or bad construciton IMO, that item is a writeoff design wise.

as for the fiskers.. its not a green wood profile either. its is literally a splitting maul profile.. it is so thick, i'd have no problem hitting steel pipes all day long with it.. but it will dent them, not bite in.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
cKc
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 09, 2020 11:50AM
Ryan, this is something im keen on.. its the larger head of my 2 hatchets, but on a stout small handle..
i like this because I'm quite happy using this as a food tool, knife general cutter and wood splitter.




this with a super thin lightweight 6" knife is perfect imo

----------------------------------------------------------------------
It's not Cliff, its Dr Stamp
#kebabstickcut, it's a thing - make it happen
Re: Extreme Lateral and Tip Strength
April 09, 2020 05:43PM
Quote
cKc
a flat head tomakawk isn't going to penetrate well compared to a nice curved axe head which localized the power to a smaller point on the edge on impact... i can think of no reason except looks to do that vs a moon cresent edge. i dont think you'd ever see that on an authentic hawk.. it would bounce off armour rather than biting in. so good or bad construciton IMO, that item is a writeoff design wise.

Well, you’re right that it won’t penetrate as deeply as a rounded bit profile, of equal dimensions otherwise. But square bits like that are very common on carpentry axes, and straight handles are often a bit more accurate than curved ones. So it’s not exactly an unheard of or random featureset.

That particular tomahawk is a design from the Vietnam war that was drawn up by Peter LaGana, so it’s definitely more combat-oriented than something like a Gränsfors Wildlife Hatchet. But if you look at the edge profile of the Model 1, it’s virtually identical to the Fiskars in length and shape, while also appearing to be quite a bit thinner behind the edge. And the overall weight is similar, similar to the Junglas as well as the Fiskars. And there’s a spike on the opposite end, which could be very nice for digging, breaking up rocky ground, moving wood around, etc. So I’d not quite write it off so soon, it might have a lot of utility.



Quote
cKc
as for the fiskers.. its not a green wood profile either. its is literally a splitting maul profile.. it is so thick, i'd have no problem hitting steel pipes all day long with it.. but it will dent them, not bite in.

Well sure it is haha just because it’s very obtuse doesn’t mean it’s a splitting profile. 0.110” behind the 15 DPS edge, followed by a 7 DPS primary grind back to 0.690” thick. That’s definitely not in the same class as a splitting maul, it’s just designed to be fluid in soft woods like pine.

Thinner hardwood patterns will bind/stick heavily with even moderate force if used on green conifers. They’re too thin for that work, the raw penetration is so high that you’ve got to back off on power or you spend more time removing the axe from the wood than you spend swinging it.