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What do you call this type of Hatchet

Posted by Aranyik 
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What do you call this type of Hatchet
August 26, 2012 12:13AM
I'm really loving this hatchet pattern. They call it a Kitchen Knife. I seen a similar one in an old Forestry video. The lumberjack was shaving off the rough axe cuts.

What do you all think? Seems like something worth having.



13” Edge, $1872 - Blank Only. Spine Thickness is not mentioned, but I'm guessing between 1/8" - 1/4"
This is Shirogami “Black” steel. From Sanjo City, Nigata Province.

If you read Japanese you can check out there marketing here: http://www.blacksmith.jp/tadamori/ksoba.html
Re: What do you call this type of Hatchet
August 26, 2012 01:24AM
$1872!!! It better do something more than cut things... like have sex spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

Price aside, it looks interesting but I'm not sure what I'd use it for. I imagine that cutting with the part of the blade behind your hand would be awkward.
Re: What do you call this type of Hatchet
August 26, 2012 02:46AM
I don't know the name of the japanese tool, but there was something relatively similar in France, used for carpentry, clogmaking, coopering, etc, a special axe called a "doloire". The handle lenght depended on the job to be done, but usually it was an asymetrical head and bit, and used either to square off a trunk or clean up the rough squaring done with a larger and heavier axe (carpentry), or to do the rough shaping of clogs. Unlike the germanic Breitbeil (broadaxe), it could come in relatively small sizes, closer to a hatchet, much as the size of this japanese knife, only it required a handle to balance it.

large carpentry model


smaller clogmaking pattern



I also just remind of another tool, a very specialised billhook used by coopers, and called "cauchoire" (various spellings), often with a offset handle:

Re: What do you call this type of Hatchet
August 26, 2012 06:25AM
Its over priced crap.
Re: What do you call this type of Hatchet
August 26, 2012 06:34AM
That is the best name yet. What if it only costed $35?
Re: What do you call this type of Hatchet
August 26, 2012 08:19AM
Quote
Aranyik
That is the best name yet. What if it only costed $35?

Regardless of price I don't get it. It looks cool, but what is its function?

I don't see how you could put much force behind the bearded part of the blade with much stability.
Re: What do you call this type of Hatchet
August 26, 2012 09:16AM
I don't really understand it either. I think that is most of the attraction for it I am having right now. First thing would be to get one and figure it out.
Re: What do you call this type of Hatchet
August 26, 2012 10:07AM
To me, it looks like an aborted broad axe. The beard could be usefull, if it had a handle, cause then it could be used with very circular strokes along the surface of the wood to plane it. But as you can only choke up, your hand and especially knuckles will always come in the way if you wanted to use the beard, and finally you can only use the upper part of the bit. I think it's basically a mincing or slicing knife, or something like that, maybe a kind of meat/bone cleaver, not an outdoor tool.
Re: What do you call this type of Hatchet
August 26, 2012 07:03PM
I was thinking that I could do push cuts into Beef with that corner where the top edge and the main edge meet.

My Japanese is very limited, but the only geometry that makes sense with the apparent 1/8" thickness is a chisel grind.

I wish the website listed more information about the product.

On Wikipedia they describe the far right grind as "Urusaki."

I don't see anything about Urusaki in this chart.. but it looks like what Wikipedia desribes as Urusaki.

Makes me wonder if the item above is "Forged" or "Single Steel Edge Laminated." This is kind of how I translate the two terms below. The chart on the far right just says that it is Soft Pig Iron on the outside with a Steel Edge. I'm assuming the edge would be Hitachi White.





Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 08/26/2012 07:15PM by Aranyik.
Re: What do you call this type of Hatchet
August 28, 2012 12:23AM
Price aside, I suppose that using it would be something to figure out. However it would give a new meaning to punching a tree, seeing as how you can't get much more ergonomic than that. ( But detail work work be impossible by my pretend motions. )

Though I for one am not able to afford a hunk of steel that may be good, if you decide to jump the gun or have one made for yerself, do come back and tell us more about this odd and curious tool.
Re: What do you call this type of Hatchet
February 07, 2013 03:45AM
It's a noodle knife!

Shun Blue Steel Menkiri Noodle Knife




Description:
Menkiri means noodle in Japanese. These knives are designed to make straight cuts in noodles.
About the steel: Introducing Shun Blue Steel. These exciting knives feature a carbon steel cutting core for a razor-sharp edge and easy re-sharpening. For easier care, the carbon core is sandwiched between two layers of stainless steel. The initial blade shapes are traditional Japanese shapes, including the honesuki boning knife, the all-purpose kiritsuke, and the menkiri noodle knife. The Shun Blue Steel line makes an exciting selection of traditional Japanese culinary knives available to professionals and avid home cooks in the West.

Features:
- Japanese san mai construction; carbon steel is sandwiched between two layers of stainless steel for the ultra-sharp benefits of carbon steel without the additional maintenance
- Cutting core of fine-grained “blue” carbon steel (hardened to 61 Rockwell) offers incredible sharpness, edge retention—and yet is easy to re-sharpen
- Mirror polish looks beautiful, enhances stain resistance
- Light bead blasting along the edge shows off the san mai construction
- Traditional Japanese handle styles
- Each knife includes a Japanese-style saya, or sheath

Specs:
- Model Number: VG0009
- Menkiri 7"
- Made in Japan
- $249.95
Re: What do you call this type of Hatchet
February 07, 2013 05:15AM
I'm sure it could be useful in in the kitchen, but for $1800 I would rather buy 9 boxes of Padron Family Reserve No. 85 Cigars, which would probably be more enjoyable. Then that knife.

Aside from that I wonder else the design could be good for and I honestly wouldn't want to apply that design to anything outside of the kitchen unless it was ax head. Then you have to wonder, how well will my hand fit the handle. In my case it probably wouldn't fit well. And then the rope on the handle, that just makes me mad.

Chum posted a way more reasonably priced knife. But still, I wouldn't be to motivated to buy it unless I was a really rich chef who owned a ramen restaurant or something.