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Himalayan Imports : 18" Ang Khola Khukuri

Posted by CliffStamp 
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Himalayan Imports : 18" Ang Khola Khukuri
August 25, 2012 11:58PM
I have had this knife since 2000, first time on video :





Nice heavy wood blade.
Re: Himalayan Imports : 18" Ang Khola Khukuri
August 26, 2012 06:29AM
I debate with myself about getting the biggest version on a weekly basis.
Re: Himalayan Imports : 18" Ang Khola Khukuri
August 27, 2012 03:58AM
Is it known what type of steel is used in these? And does the heat treat work well with said steel.

Edge wise, would you say it is proficient for overall work? Or is it more along the lines of strictly processing wood?

How bad is the vibration in the handle when chopping ( If at all )

As for its performance in chopping, that's a pretty impressive blade.
Re: Himalayan Imports : 18" Ang Khola Khukuri
August 27, 2012 09:50AM
I think the steel is 5160.

Here are a few things to consider. A traditional kuk comes with 2 smaller blades. Blades can be a bit of a stretch as one is not sharpened and some say it's for steeling the edge while others say it for sharpening. The other blade is sharp and it is used for detail work and smaller chores.
Basically when you look at it and think, you'll notice that it is a system, just like for the western world a hatchet, a small knife and a sharpening stone or file were.
Re: Himalayan Imports : 18" Ang Khola Khukuri
August 27, 2012 12:52PM
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Agith
Is it known what type of steel is used in these? And does the heat treat work well with said steel.

They are spring steels, recycled from heavy trucks, at least this was the case 12+ years ago when I bought them.

Quote



Edge wise, would you say it is proficient for overall work? Or is it more along the lines of strictly processing wood?

The blade is fairly heavy, 900+ grams. However the edge angle is actually more acute than on most folders, it is less than 15 dps. The blade thickens rapidly so you can't cut a turnip with it easily, but on shallow work it works very well. I reviewed a number of them, there are lots of cutting comparisons in the reviews. They can easily out cut the standard large blade profiles which are commonly 0.045"/20 dps.

Quote


How bad is the vibration in the handle when chopping ( If at all )

Annealed/tapered tang, edge quenched blade, proper balanced sweet spot. There is nothing felt when chopping aside from the raw energy of impact, but no shock/vibration.
Re: Himalayan Imports : 18" Ang Khola Khukuri
July 13, 2013 03:07PM
Thought I'd jump in with a little bit of extra up to date info on what kind of stuff goes on in the various khukuri houses.
5160 is still what is used for the majority of blades. However, these leaf springs are becoming increasingly expensive and some houses have been known to occasionally use EN-31. Which I understand to be very similar to 52100, a ball bearing steel. Not what would traditionally be used, though it has recently been proven in the field with quite a few large choppers being made out of it. I have khukuris made both of EN-31 and 5160, both of which get plenty of use. Performance wise they aren't as dissimilar as you might imagine, but there is a noticeable toughness advantage the 5160 and what I perceive is a finer edge being reached on the EN-31. I can't comment on corrosion resistance as I force a patina for my users.
Quality of heat treat differs greatly from house to house, but in my experience it's quite good. They're differentially heat treated through pouring water onto the blades with a teapot, selectively choosing where they want to harden.
This is why I have major reservations about the use of EN-31. This simple heat treat method is capable of great results and is time tested for 5160, but I've read that 52100 has a far more complex and fussy heat treat, which I doubt they will be able to satisfy with a teapot and water.
As stated though, my 52100 khukuri is still a performer, though does not quite have the hardness I would expect from the steel, which suggests that they might not have gotten the best out of the steel in heat treat. Another thing is that I feel my edge durability is decreasing with repeated sharpenings on my 52100 khukuri, regardless of my gradual reduction in edge angle.
This has got me wondering if the hardness is just very shallow and if I've worked my way to a softer core over time. If I get any clarity on this, I will be certain to pass it on.

As a little expansion on cliff's answer, I don't enjoy using my giga chopping khukuri for light stuff at all. If you get the knife moving quick enough it can definitely perform machete tasks, however slowing it down afterwards makes me fatigued in a short amount of time.