Welcome! Log In Create A New Profile

Advanced

36 grit dressing stone

Posted by CliffStamp 
36 grit dressing stone
October 23, 2014 12:41AM
These are NOT sharpening stones, they are small stones (2.5 cm vs 15 cm) :



and both extremely coarse and extremely hard meaning they will not gouge, wear or pretty much release abrasive under normal circumstances. This is because they are not meant to be used sharpening knives (or anything else) but to jam against a grinding wheel at high speed and cut the grinding wheel to level or deglaze it and thus they have to be very resistant to wear. This should show you the extreme level of coarseness :



I actually had to tone the magnification down to 5X because at 50X you can't even see one grit/abrasive they are that huge. As for water, the stone is very open so water soaks through it. I use it wet just to control the dust and to provide some lubrication for actually setting the apex.

Again now, this isn't a sharpening stone :

-the edges are not rounded
-the grit is very uneven and has bits poking up from the surface
-it isn't flat/even at all

As for grinding, I started off with a very easy to grind steel, a Chef's knife in 3Cr13 steel (very soft) from Everyday Essentials :



That is what the edge looks like if you just grind it to an apex without really being too particular about how the apex forms. Note the massive gouges from the grits and the deformation of the apex itself. In order to make this cut you kind of need high pressures as the grits are not inherently sharp. I used a 5 lbs load on the ~1/16" wide bevel on the Chef's knife and since the stone is about 1" wide this gives a pressure of just under 100 psi.

With that pressure the cutting speed is very high, in particular I could reset the apex on the chef's knife with about 20-30 pps in contrast to 50-60 pps on the Suehiro Chemical with the same force. The Suehiro is wider (6.5 vs 2.5 cm) which reduces the pressure way down to 30 psi. It is likely if I increased the force on the Suehiro to drive the pressure up to the same as being used on the dressing stone then the cutting speed would be similar, however it simply isn't practical to sharpen with ~15 lbs.

Can it be used to sharpen - yes, at least for now on these easy to grind steels. Since it is extremely hard there is no real issue with many of the problems with waterstones and I could set the apex on the Everyday Essentials fairly trivially to :

-get a push cut on light exercise paper at about 1/4"
-shave (but rough)
-35-40% of optimal sharpness measured on the Bergia
-5 lbs cut on 1/2" help, 2" draw

I did a couple of edge retention runs, TCE of 3.6 (2) in with a 15 dps micro-bevel. This is actually slightly higher than the Farid/K2 with the as-boxed performance. I am going to start doing edge retention runs with each stone I have with this knife which should be kind of interesting.

This is the apex after a hemp runs :



The bit jagged bits are still there from the initial apex, however there are large flat spots which show the wear, very little deformation which is interesting.

I also used it on the Suehiro as a flattening stone, it cut into that stone like it is butter. It is not trivial to use such a small stone as a flattening stone but it can be done and it does work very fast.

A few interesting questions :

-does this load, if so how can it be cleaned
-how can it be flattened
-can it be used on a much harder and higher carbide steel

I don't think either of the first two are practical problems because I will use this on occasion as a flattening stone and I should be able to just blow out any grit with water. However I don't think it is likely to be practical to use on harder to grind steels unless you really like to apply massive forces in sharpening. But I do a lot of sharpening of cheap kitchen knives and so I can see a use for this on those blades.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
October 23, 2014 12:59AM
I've used one of these several times to reset edge bevels, and the last time I used it, it seemed very glazed in comparison to the start...and it seemed to cut significantly worse. I'll try to take another look at it to see if I can offer any commentary.

I know I used some of the edges to add some sharpening choils. That worked well.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Always in search of a good choppa'
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
October 23, 2014 06:58AM
Well isn't the abrasive here so large that you wouldn't actually be cutting the carbides? Steel only
Same with what you've commented on 36 and other low grit belts

_______________
Coffee and Blood
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
October 23, 2014 12:22PM
Quote
Shurdi3
Well isn't the abrasive here so large that you wouldn't actually be cutting the carbides?

This would tend to happen even far above this when is why in general shaping a steel isn't as difficult in relative terms as polishing. Note if you look at the history of development of S30V for example no one complained about grinding S60V (440V) just finishing it.

Quote
C Amber
I've used one of these several times to reset edge bevels, and the last time I used it, it seemed very glazed in comparison to the start...and it seemed to cut significantly worse.

The abrasive in this stone is designed not to fracture so it is likely to just wear smooth by design. The only way to stop this I suspect is to use a very coarse abrasive on it (36 grit lapping compound), use extremely high contact pressures to break the grit (not sure this is possible), work on very easy to grind steels (to tear abrasive out), or flatten very coarse stones to break up the abrasive - or some combination of all of that.

Ideally, and this solution makes no sense practically, you could lap it, or just use it periodically with say 12-24 grit CBN or diamond as that would cut up the surface. However that loose grit is likely far more expensive than the stone so it would make no sense unless you had a source of it for free. If you know a jeweler for example and sharpen their knives you could likely get some of that loose grit as they often buy it in large bags.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
October 23, 2014 12:36PM
Do they use the non fracturing SiC as opposed to the Aluminum Oxide so that it can handle the heavy pressures and forces?

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Always in search of a good choppa'
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
October 23, 2014 02:56PM
Silicon carbide inherently will fracture more than aluminum oxide, but you can make aluminum oxide which is sharp edge fracturing (the "ceramic" belts are like that). With the dressing stones they are made out of both aluminum oxide and silicon carbide and in both cases they have an extremely hard binder which holds the abrasive in place. This doesn't fracture like the TASK but the abrasive looks like it. However I don't think I could tell silicon carbide vs aluminum oxide just by looking at it anyway.

If you want an interesting contrast to this stone :

-TASK, similar grit - extremely weak binder, almost a 100% opposite
-Sigma Power 120, similar grit, inbetween this and the TASK, closer to the dressing stone (but maybe can be moved closer to the TASK with wear/use)

This to me is another case of how a stone isn't really good/bad, just more/less suited to different pressure ranges and working on different steels.

For example the TASK isn't well suited to the very easy to grind (very soft) kitchen knives because you don't need the constant flow of fresh grit and so yo have to fight/focus on trying to minimum the grit loss. It is very easy to press a little too hard and sheer off grit which isn't worn - conclusion bad stone.

The dressing stone is likely to fail to grind a very hard to cut steel at all because it won't release fresh abrasive and will likely feel very slick - conclusion bad stone.

However if you reverse them - conclusion, great stones.

This is a huge problem in people evaluating stones because the more I look at it the more obvious it becomes when people report problems with stones they either :

-use too much pressure or not enough
-try to sharpen a steel the abrasive isn't designed to cut
-don't understand what a muddy stone does and why it polishes well but not necessarily sharpens well
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
October 23, 2014 03:05PM
When you say the TASK fractures? Do you mean the abrasive breaks down or the stone releases abrasive? Sorry, the terminology is starting to confuse me.

Thank you for the clarification on the two abrasives too, and I totally agree on stone evaluation. People evaluate them seemingly from their goal, without knowing if the stone was appropriate for it or not.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Always in search of a good choppa'
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
October 23, 2014 03:21PM
Both happen almost immediately, just take a look at some sample grit flushed off the stone and how much they vary in size :



Given the extensive range it looks like it fractures easily because the grit in the stone isn't close to that variable. But this stone is so soft when wet you can literally carve it up and see a hollow form as you scrape off grit (you can cut deeper than the grit size). Of course it is also going to fracture at the same time and in fact maybe it is fracturing which is how it releases anyway.

The curious thing is that these two behaviors have similar net effects (worn grit pulling free vs worn grit fracturing) :

-high stone wear
-constant high aggression

The main difference you see is in the scratch patterns as stones which fracture and don't form a slurry tend to have massive random deep scratches and a bunch of very small ones. However look at an edge from a stone which just wears and it won't look like that at all, the scratches will be very uniform.

If the grit pulls out then it will roll around so you will also get non-parallel grind lines. But you will start crushing it as well between the other abrasive and the knife also.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/23/2014 03:22PM by CliffStamp.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
October 23, 2014 04:23PM
Quote
CliffStamp
Both happen almost immediately, just take a look at some sample grit flushed off the stone and how much they vary in size :



Thank you for the pic...very clear illustration

Quote

Given the extensive range it looks like it fractures easily because the grit in the stone isn't close to that variable. But this stone is so soft when wet you can literally carve it up and see a hollow form as you scrape off grit (you can cut deeper than the grit size). Of course it is also going to fracture at the same time and in fact maybe it is fracturing which is how it releases anyway.

The curious thing is that these two behaviors have similar net effects (worn grit pulling free vs worn grit fracturing) :

-high stone wear
-constant high aggression

When we are talking about worn grit fracturing and contributing to the above two results, what are the processes here?
I assume the aggression is maintained by the grit fracturing and releasing new sharp facets? This would seemingly create an aggressive but finer abrasive though. So I assume that as the grit itself fractures, it eventually get small enough it falls out of the binder and exposes larger pieces for the whole process to begin again?

Quote

The main difference you see is in the scratch patterns as stones which fracture and don't form a slurry tend to have massive random deep scratches and a bunch of very small ones. However look at an edge from a stone which just wears and it won't look like that at all, the scratches will be very uniform.

If the grit pulls out then it will roll around so you will also get non-parallel grind lines. But you will start crushing it as well between the other abrasive and the knife also.

Ok, so we have three things happening here:
1. Stone that fractures but doesn't form a slurry, you get the large pieces, and the broken down pieces scratching the blade, producing random deep ones from the large pieces that didn't break down before being pulled free
2. You have a stone that just wears...the facets smooth out and so the scratch pattern becomes more and more refined
3. You have stones that fracture and form a slurry, but the slurry breaks down and the grit also moves in 4 directions producing an even scratch pattern.

Is that right?

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Always in search of a good choppa'
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
October 23, 2014 04:44PM
Quote
C Amber

So I assume that as the grit itself fractures, it eventually get small enough it falls out of the binder and exposes larger pieces for the whole process to begin again?

Yeah and in general you tend to get weak bonds there as well to prevent a lot of very small facets from taking over because at some point the force to make a fracture is reduced heavily (when the grit is very small) and thus you want it to then be pulled out and not just wear smooth. If you think about it then it should be obvious that balancing the binder and abrasive properties isn't trivial at all.


Quote

1. Stone that fractures but doesn't form a slurry, you get the large pieces, and the broken down pieces scratching the blade, producing random deep ones from the large pieces that didn't break down before being pulled free
2. You have a stone that just wears...the facets smooth out and so the scratch pattern becomes more and more refined
3. You have stones that fracture and form a slurry, but the slurry breaks down and the grit also moves in 4 directions producing an even scratch pattern.

Yeah, very nice summary.

You can complicate that by adding grit to the stones. For example you can add coarse grit to a stone which is hard enough to cut it and both cut the abrasive and gouge it out. Silicon carbide will do this to most stones, CBN will as well but won't break down itself but silicon carbide will.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
October 23, 2014 05:00PM
Quote
CliffStamp

Yeah and in general you tend to get weak bonds there as well to prevent a lot of very small facets from taking over because at some point the force to make a fracture is reduced heavily (when the grit is very small) and thus you want it to then be pulled out and not just wear smooth. If you think about it then it should be obvious that balancing the binder and abrasive properties isn't trivial at all.

Do you mean the force to make a fracture is greater as the facets get smaller? Sorry, just thinking that if as the facets get smaller it is easier to fracture, you could just fracture it right out of the binder regardless of the strength of the binder.

And yes, it would be very interesting to talk to the people who's job it is to formulate these things. Have you tried contacting any of the material's engineers at Norton or anything? Knowing you and how you've done that with steel manufacturers, seems like a move you would have done already.


Quote

You can complicate that by adding grit to the stones. For example you can add coarse grit to a stone which is hard enough to cut it and both cut the abrasive and gouge it out. Silicon carbide will do this to most stones, CBN will as well but won't break down itself but silicon carbide will.

And only you like to complicate things that much smiling smiley

Would low grit SiC be a good thing to try to lap the 24 grit Nubatama then?

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Always in search of a good choppa'
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
October 24, 2014 01:02AM
Quote
C Amber

...just thinking that if as the facets get smaller it is easier to fracture

Imagine a stone about 1m in diameter which is partially embedded in concrete. Take a sledgehammer to it and start pounding - is it more likely you will break pieces off the stone (very easy) or knock it free of the concrete (impossible).

The strength of the bond of an abrasive is going to be related to the surface area of the abrasive, the ability to fracture pretty much isn't at all. It is just as easy to break a piece of ice on an iceberg as it is on ice cube for example.

As abrasives gets smaller then at some point the bond strength will be smaller than the fracture limit. It will then get torn out vs fracturing again.When designing a bonding media you ideally set the strength to maintain a minimum abrasive grain size.


Quote

...seems like a move you would have done already.

I need to spend some time on ceramic metallurgy and physical chemistry to allow an intelligent conversation.

Quote

Would low grit SiC be a good thing to try to lap the 24 grit Nubatama then?

I would suspect so, ideally even lower, and ideally CBN or diamond - but the cost is an argument for what is practical.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 10/24/2014 01:05AM by CliffStamp.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
November 21, 2014 02:02AM
As a few updates, while this isn't in general a good sharpening stone because it just wears flat and loses all cutting ability, it does do a few things well :

-grind the corners and edges of waterstones down

-flatten the edges of knives to remove recurves and major damage

-restore tips

The reason it does the last two well is because the pressure is so high compared to sharpening and I mean really high. It is trivial to generate over 100 psi in that work with very low force (< 1 lbs applied) while in sharpening even 10 psi is a high effort (> 1 lbs applied) .
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 01, 2015 10:44PM
As an update, here is the kind of edge it produces as boxed :



I decided to check out something I believed to be true and lapped the dressing stone with an x-coarse DMT plate. The DMT cut the stone readily and produced a fine slurry, mineral oil was used as the cutting fluid.

I then put a 15 dps micro-bevel, the knife :

-easily shaved, just a hint of side bias (shaved slightly better on one side)
-push cut newsprint at 1/4" from the PoH (point of hold)
-was 150-160 grams to cut the Espirit thread
-2.5 to 3 mm to slice Bergia spinning thread under a 35 gram load

In contrast, as boxed the push cutting sharpness was way lower (as in this is 2-4 times sharper), similar slicing aggression. This was the edge prepared for the micro-bevel by the Naniwa Aotoshi :



here is the micro-bevel :



Note any difference from this and the as-boxed stone edge, they are kind of different. I suspected this would happen because I thought all the DMT would do was plane down the silicon carbide and produce a very flat non-cutting surface which would mainly burnish the edge. This is pretty much exactly what happened. The knife felt very slick on the stone, similar to burnishing it as that was what it was doing.

Here is the surface of the stone :



You can almost make out the flattening here. I turned it a little until I got the picture I wanted :



That isn't loading. I just adjusted the light until it reflected from the surface of the abrasive. The diamond just planed it down into large flats. As the diamond grit is so much smaller than the abrasive/stone grit, it can cut each piece individually and shape them, they don't fracture, they get cut.

The edge retention on a slice from this edge is really low, with that above finish. The TCE is 0.5 (1). This is similar to the TCE from the medium Spyderco rods. The TCE with the as-boxed edge off of the dressing stone was 3.5 (2) almost seven times higher.

As an side, if you ever want to make a dressing hone into a polishing stone, this is how you do it. In order to restore it to a aggressive cutting stone I think it has to be lapped with a much more coarse abrasive, ideally a diamond abrasive which is so big it fractures the silicon carbide as it cuts it.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 01, 2015 11:24PM
Did you try to lap other stones /Norton crystolon or coarse india / with this dressing stone after you flatten it.

I am asking because:

... here in Bulgaria is pretty easy to buy a correction/dressing stones for grinding wheels made of vitrified black SiC with high hardness of the ceramic bond and very open structure and they are very cheap - 5 to 10 $ /bulgarian or german/




but nothing like the flattening stones made by norton, or naniwa - no flat surfaces from the factory, no grooves for easy cleaning during lapping...



If I remember correctly the black SiC in role of lapping compound is suitable for glass, ceramic, cast iron and not recommended for alloy steels.

In your opinion will these stones / after lapping with very coarse grit SiC abrasive grain to be dead flat / be suitable for lapping sharpening stones made of aluminium oxide or green SiC /harder than black/ with ceramic bond and medium to open structure.


and one more question - in your opinion two stones form the same manufacturer with the same ceramic binder, same hardness of the binder, same open structure but one is green SiC 150/320 grit - the other black SiC 150/240 - can the black one be used for lapping the green one although the green SiC is harder than the black one

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Life is GOOD!

[www.youtube.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/01/2015 11:36PM by stefan_wolf.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 12:37AM
Quote
stefan_wolf
Did you try to lap other stones /Norton crystolon or coarse india / with this dressing stone after you flatten it.

Yes, it isn't great for that unless you do something to be able to apply a lot of pressure. If you are going to do that you need to make some kind of mount you can glue this to as you want to be able to apply 50+ lbs into it to get it to crush the abrasive. If you go much lighter than that then nothing really happens as the abrasives just wear smooth against each other and starts polishing. The stones will flatten at some point but the cutting action will be really low.


Quote

If I remember correctly the black SiC in role of lapping compound is suitable for glass, ceramic, cast iron and not recommended for alloy steels.

Neither are actually used in industry to grind ferrous metals, there is too much chemical wear due to diffusion of carbon. However for hand grinding I doubt you could reach the pressures/temperatures. Black is softer but much tougher, green is harder and more brittle.

Quote

In your opinion will these stones / after lapping with very coarse grit SiC abrasive grain to be dead flat / be suitable for lapping sharpening stones made of aluminium oxide or green SiC /harder than black/ with ceramic bond and medium to open structure.

Not unless you are really strong and don't mind applying a lot of force.


Quote

and one more question - in your opinion two stones form the same manufacturer with the same ceramic binder, same hardness of the binder, same open structure but one is green SiC 150/320 grit - the other black SiC 150/240 - can the black one be used for lapping the green one although the green SiC is harder than the black one

Good question, based on the properties they should. I have been trying to source a green silicon carbide dressing stone of similar grit because I want to see if the difference in properties is significant in hand sharpening. The TASK silicon carbide stone I have is way more friable but I believe that is the bond, not the abrasive fracturing as it happens so trivially.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 12:42AM
In addition to using the x-coarse DMT, I also tried using 36 grit loose grit silicon carbide, again with mineral oil. All that happened is that they just ground against each other. I gave it a few attempts and tried to stop grinding just when the 36 grit paste started being really crunchy but it didn't seem to be able to restore the surface to that initial aggressive finish. Now I would not expect it would as it is basically just grinding two 36 grit silicon carbide papers against each other.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 01:23AM
Any idea how you will fix that stone now?

www.theflatearthsociety.org

BIGFOOT FINDS YOU, YOU DON'T FIND BIGFOOT!



IT IS THE E-NEP THROWING BROTHERHOOD
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 01:44AM
Ah, now you went and ruined the surprise. I have a 36 grit brazed diamond plate. I am fairly sure it can recut the surface of the stone.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 01:53AM
Quote
CliffStamp
Ah, now you went and ruined the surprise. I have a 36 grit brazed diamond plate. I am fairly sure it can recut the surface of the stone.


Y you no tell us?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bill22252 on YouTube. "See you space cowboy"

Resident Emerson Fanboi

Folding knives are fun, fixed blades are important.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 02:00AM
What I have is a bunch of brazed samples, they are 1"x1". I will be working with them shortly to see how they compared to the normal nickel type diamond plates (DMT).
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 02:04AM
I like to imagine Cliff has a whole room filled with really cool one off / unique / experimental pieces he has been given / acquired. Giant choppers made from unobtainium, waterstones that never dish, always cut aggressively and leave no burr, and edges so thin and yet tough he can carve up M2 hack saw blades.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Always in search of a good choppa'
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 01:30PM
Quote
CliffStamp
I have been trying to source a green silicon carbide dressing stone of similar grit because I want to see if the difference in properties is significant in hand sharpening. The TASK silicon carbide stone I have is way more friable but I believe that is the bond, not the abrasive fracturing as it happens so trivially.

I contacted one of the local abrasive manufacturers and asked what they use for grinding wheel dressing stones -> the answer was vitrified black SiC with at least 98% purity and diamond dust /unfortunately no specifications here/ with very hard ceramic binder. I am waiting to have some in stock to try it out...

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Life is GOOD!

[www.youtube.com]
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 05:34PM
Previously I noted that explanation for the low edge retention from this stone on the hemp runs I was doing was due to the type of abrasive. I figured this was a blocky grit made for strength/toughness vs a sharp edged grit made for cutting as on grinding belts. These types of grits actually do exist.

However after some reading this isn't true, they abrasive using in this dressing stone isn't dissimilar to other silicon carbide stones. It just is really coarse and has a really strong bond. So then how to explain the difference in edges from this and the 36 grit aluminum oxide sanding belt as they are very different.

This is the dressing stone edge :



and the 36 grit sanding belt edge :



I thought this was because of the type of abrasive, however this isn't true. I then thought it was how I was sharpening it as the 36 grit dressing stone was one of the first of the ultra-coarse abrasives used. I then tried sharpening using oil on the dressing stone and much lighter force :



+



The initial cutting ability is quite high :

-8-9 lbs to slice 1/2" manilla hemp on a 2" draw

After 500+ slices into the hemp, the force on a slice increased to 15-16 lbs and the edge was showing significant wear but obviously could keep cutting :



It would be easily to do 1000+ cuts and have the force under 20 lbs and this is a $1 3Cr13 stainless steel knife. In short, it isn't the type of abrasive, it was just how I was sharpening it. Note that I did this grinding on the back side which is still as-boxed sharp as I kept it as a reference point. This is one of the benefits of having two sides, if you keep one rarely used you have a solid reference for as-boxed cutting ability.

In regards to more detailed statistics, the TCE increased to 7.4 (2) with the new edge from oil+light force which approximately doubled over the previous edge it was producing. The initial sharpness and cutting ability was also higher.

As a really whacky idea. If you took one of these stones and lapped one side with a diamond abrasive and kept the other side cutting aggressively (still don't have that figured out yet) then it would be a fairly decent sharpening tool. The flattened down side cuts similar to a Spyderco Medium. The as-boxed finish is extremely fast, especially considering there is no force limitation, this stone ignores 100+ psi. I had to put ~500 psi on it to get it to fracture and this took grinding on it with heavy force with a 1/4" wide chisel on a tiny 1/32" high bevel.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 09:45PM
This is how you recondition the stone :



That is the slurry from a 36 grit brazed diamond plate :



+



It easily cuts pieces off of the dressing stone. It returns the stone to putting on that aggressive slicing bevel :



+



+



I was curious about using these for sharpening (the brazed plates), but as an immediate aside they look to be useful for lapping. A 3x12" 36 brazed plate would be wonderful to have for conditioning oil stones and general tomfoolery. When you were bored you could chamfer all the edges on your granite counter tops.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 10:12PM
How costly would such a thing conceivably be?

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Always in search of a good choppa'
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 10:26PM
They don't exist, I am going to check into it.
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 10:46PM
Who needs a forum knife when you can have a forum flattening stone!?!? Lol

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Always in search of a good choppa'
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 10:49PM
I wonder what karat size relates to 36 grit? Would ypur diamond lapping stone make my wife's wedding ring look cheap?

Also how do they process the diamonds to a 36 grit do they somehow crush them or are they cut to shape?

www.theflatearthsociety.org

BIGFOOT FINDS YOU, YOU DON'T FIND BIGFOOT!



IT IS THE E-NEP THROWING BROTHERHOOD
Re: 36 grit dressing stone
April 02, 2015 11:07PM
They are about 1/2 mm .

As an amusing note, if you like large rings, you could get a small flat plate on a ring, say 1/4" x 1/4", and use the same 36 grit coating. I am not sure if it would be Snody level bling, but you would have a portable device to condition any stone very quickly. If you wanted to be all geared out, use the tungsten carbide rings that are becoming popular now.
Sorry, you do not have permission to post/reply in this forum.