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Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents

Posted by RFL 
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RFL
Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 02, 2015 07:48PM
I checked the relative cost of the oils, lubricants and solvents that I have used. I was curious about the current prices if I had to repurchase any. Most of what I have was not purchased, it came from my parents' basement (one of my uncles has owned a paint store since the early 1960's). I did not even know that 3-in-1 oil no longer came in a metal can. I grew up with a dozen or so cans spread throughout the basement, garage, and shed.

All of the following I have used on cutlery, tools and sharpening stones for lubrication and cleaning (except the linseed oil, the old can dried out). The values are in cents per fluid ounce if bought by the quart or gallon for most products. The prices are from Home Depot and Wal-mart since I am too far from the paint store.

Kerosene ----- ----- 8.4 ----- cents per fluid ounce
Generic Paint Thinner ----- ----- 8.6 ----- "
Mineral Oil USP grade ---------- 9.6----- "
Mineral Spirits ---------- 11.5 ----- "
Generic Baby Oil ---------- 14.1 ----- "
WD-40 ---------- 15.6 ----- "
Linseed Oil Boiled ---------- 18.7 ----- "
Johnson's Baby Oil ----- ----- 19.2 ----- "
Turpentine ----- ----- 21.8 ----- "
Ballistol ---------- 68.7 ----- "
3-In-1 Oil ---------- 99 ----- "

For its low cost and nontoxic, inert nature, white mineral oil (USP grade) seems to be the most practical for general use.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 05/02/2015 08:03PM by RFL.
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 05, 2015 03:17AM
I think you are right about the mineral oil, it's inexpensive, available, multipurpose, food safe, and relatively harmless.
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 05, 2015 07:56AM
My Mineral oil (Liquid paraffin, 1 litre, AU$12.15 from Bunnings) works out at about 36 cents per floz, unfortunately. It's made to seal the surface of water in tanks.

I checked veterinary supply places for jugs of horse laxative (the same paraffin) and the cost was similar or higher than the Bunnings, chemists sold it for twice as much.
Eli
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 05, 2015 08:31AM
The US seems to be unique to have access to "Food grade" labeled mineral oil. It is not easily found in Europe.
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 05, 2015 09:00AM
Quote
SecondCrack
My Mineral oil (Liquid paraffin, 1 litre, AU$12.15 from Bunnings) works out at about 36 cents per floz, unfortunately. It's made to seal the surface of water in tanks.

I checked veterinary supply places for jugs of horse laxative (the same paraffin) and the cost was similar or higher than the Bunnings, chemists sold it for twice as much.
dollar stores have the best deal on baby oil, 10 fl oz for a dollar, so 10 cents us for 1 fl oz
walmart has it for 14.1 cents a fl oz
pretty much every other store is more expensive smiling smiley even house brand
most expensive is johnson&johnson brand at 36 cents per fl oz
but onnline you can find even more expensive deals

someone on the internet made the argument, since babies put everything in their mouths, baby oil is food grade smiling smiley get the unscented kind

____
Thanks
I don't mow smiling smiley
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 05, 2015 12:44PM
I have plenty of baby oil, gifted to us when my kids were born. It's all scented though, and a bit thinner than the paraffin I bought. The scent is quite strong and stubborn, it's harder to wash off a knife than the oil is.

The supermarkets and discount chains used to have unscented, at half the price I paid for paraffin, but I can't find it anywhere at the moment, and from memory it's the same as the scented one: quite thin. I'll still keep my eye out for it though.
RFL
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 07, 2015 03:19PM
(edit to fix broken img link - only actual direct image links can be parsed as images)

[www.walmart.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/07/2015 04:17PM by CliffStamp.
RFL
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 08, 2015 01:11PM
In another thread I commented about the viscosity of mineral oil compared to baby and bath oils:

I have used USP (food and medicinal grade) mineral oil on various stones and it is not overly viscous, but it is thicker than baby oil and bath/body oil.

On smoother stones, I use very little, and on much coarser stones a liberal amount is not problematic. On coarse SiC or Norton India (very coarse if new) the mineral oil (liquid paraffin) soaks in readily. The mineral oil seems to be at least twice (if not three times) the viscosity of Baby Oil (light liquid paraffin) or body/bath oil.

I can buy mineral oil in any drugstore or grocery store, it is sold as a laxative for $1.53 for 16 ozs. That is why the USP grade is more viscous, it is meant to coat the inside of the intestines to prevent water absorption. When sold as a laxative, the mineral oil is heavy weight and when sold as baby oil it is considered light weight.

Body/bath oils do not use mineral oil as a base. They use lighter organic oils with various solvents, emulsifiers and fragrances. The emulsifiers aid skin penetration and moisture retention. These emulsifiers and surfactants may cause the non-mineral oils to be absorbed by the stone immediately and thereby not be as effective as a surface lubricant, leading to premature glazing. The mineral oil stays pooled on the surface.

I have diluted the semi-viscous (heavy weight) mineral oil with mineral spirits (paint thinner) or turpentine and there was very little difference noted on the stone in use. Kerosene (lamp oil) produced similar results, it is only mildly effective as a solvent for the heavy weight mineral oil. When used alone, kerosene soaks into a porous stone immediately, but on a hard, dense stone it stays on the surface, similar to using WD-40.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/08/2015 01:14PM by RFL.
Eli
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 08, 2015 04:44PM
Is there a recommendation when to use viscous and when to use thin oil? Presumably oil that runs through a stone is less useful than one that stays on the surface. But aside from that, what decides how viscous should the oil be be? Does it depend on grit/particle size or material? I can see now that oil is a better choice as lubricant for diamond plates than water, as diamonds are naturally lipophilic and hydrophobic. But other than that?
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 08, 2015 04:47PM
Eli: I like oil on diamond plates far more than water for the simple reason that it doesn't evaporate. Otherwise, I have found that it prevents loading on fine diamond stones better water as well.

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Eee
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 09, 2015 12:14PM
Quote
Bugout Bill
Eli: I like oil on diamond plates far more than water for the simple reason that it doesn't evaporate. Otherwise, I have found that it prevents loading on fine diamond stones better water as well.

Do you know if there is an issue with using WD40 on diamond plates? I recall there are all sorts of solvents in it that can degrade some materials. Obviously not the diamonds, but maybe the bond of the plate to the base? It just happens to be what I have in the house.
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 09, 2015 12:30PM
Quote
Eee
Quote
Bugout Bill
Eli: I like oil on diamond plates far more than water for the simple reason that it doesn't evaporate. Otherwise, I have found that it prevents loading on fine diamond stones better water as well.

Do you know if there is an issue with using WD40 on diamond plates? I recall there are all sorts of solvents in it that can degrade some materials. Obviously not the diamonds, but maybe the bond of the plate to the base? It just happens to be what I have in the house.

i went kinda crazy at the office with various oils and solvents looking for the best one for sharpening and best for cleaning. either wd40 or brake cleaner ate the glue that held the plate to the base on my diamond stone. didnt hurt the diamonds. stone still works, just have to be gentle.
i use mineral oil from Bulk Apothecary, seems to be thinner than laxative kind but heavier than baby oil. i also use it to finish my cutting boards. [www.bulkapothecary.com]
they carry a wide range of oils if anyone wants to speriment.
scott
Eee
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 09, 2015 02:24PM
Quote
oldsailorsknives

i went kinda crazy at the office with various oils and solvents looking for the best one for sharpening and best for cleaning. either wd40 or brake cleaner ate the glue that held the plate to the base on my diamond stone. didnt hurt the diamonds. stone still works, just have to be gentle.
i use mineral oil from Bulk Apothecary, seems to be thinner than laxative kind but heavier than baby oil. i also use it to finish my cutting boards. [www.bulkapothecary.com]
they carry a wide range of oils if anyone wants to speriment.
scott

Thanks Scott smiling smiley
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 09, 2015 03:06PM
Eee: DMT's website has stated that WD40 and kerosene won't hurt them.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bill22252 on YouTube. "See you space cowboy"

Resident Emerson Fanboi

Folding knives are fun, fixed blades are important.
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 11, 2015 03:27AM
Why is water left off the list?

Eli
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 11, 2015 04:32AM
I think water has just a single, low viscosity. What are good water based lubricants of variable viscosity for the oil haters here? (I suspect some waterstones are designed to release lubricants, but it would be nice to be able to apply them by the bottle.) I know Glycerine, Smith's honing solution. Anything thicker?
Re: Relative Cost of Lubricants and Solvents
May 11, 2015 01:09PM
I used to use 3 in 1 oil. Then for my work switched to just using water....that has lead to long term issues of loading. I am switching to Mineral oil now perhaps that will help with loading issues I have had with some of my stones.