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Atoma 140

Posted by YESH 
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Atoma 140
September 15, 2015 02:18AM
What is this stone best utilized for in your opinion? WIll it hold up well to reprofiling edges to lower angles over time?
Re: Atoma 140
September 15, 2015 04:17AM
Quote
Nothingman
What is this stone best utilized for in your opinion? WIll it hold up well to reprofiling edges to lower angles over time?

I have used diamond stones for a long time, they work exceptionally well in setting an apex, for grinding bevels, not so much unless :

-you are using very low force

+

-grinding very high carbide steels
Re: Atoma 140
September 16, 2015 01:06AM
So just to make sure I am understanding you, if I was to only be grinding existing edge bevels it should hold up fine…. though establishing new bevels will be abusive to the plate typically unless it meets your criteria you mentioned?
Re: Atoma 140
September 16, 2015 01:23AM
I haven't used Atoma, but I do have some experience with the DMT XC stone. I generally agree with Cliff, the can be used to grind a bevel, but you need to be light with force. A decent SiC or Alox oilstone is going to be faster if you can anchor it down as you can use high force and really hog off metal.

I planed down the primary on a Benchmade 530 when I was younger and dumber using a DMT XC, With heavy force, it didn't really strip out the coating, but it did lose some aggression, though the stone is still very serviceable.

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Re: Atoma 140
September 16, 2015 01:30AM
Quote
Nothingman
..... though establishing new bevels will be abusive to the plate typically unless it meets your criteria you mentioned?

I would not say it is abusive, I just think unless you grind really light you are likely to see better results with other abrasives as you can use much more force and thus get much faster results. If you really lean into most plates, because they are shallow electroplating, you are likely to damage the surface and remove the abrasive.
Re: Atoma 140
September 16, 2015 02:06PM
Quote
CliffStamp
Quote
Nothingman
..... though establishing new bevels will be abusive to the plate typically unless it meets your criteria you mentioned?

I would not say it is abusive, I just think unless you grind really light you are likely to see better results with other abrasives as you can use much more force and thus get much faster results. If you really lean into most plates, because they are shallow electroplating, you are likely to damage the surface and remove the abrasive.

That makes me question the utility of a diamond plate of such a low grit, what other purposes would such a coarse stone typically be used for other than bevel setting?
Re: Atoma 140
September 16, 2015 02:14PM
Nothingman: You want a really coarse edge finish. DMT XC is a pretty nice utility edge for a lot of applications if you need slicing aggression. Even in the kitchen, an XC finish is very workable provided the edge is properly sharpened.

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Bill22252 on YouTube. "See you space cowboy"

Resident Emerson Fanboi

Folding knives are fun, fixed blades are important.
Re: Atoma 140
September 16, 2015 07:59PM
It's good for fixing chips and other damage, and it's fairly fast, and it will cut most steels fast.
Re: Atoma 140
September 16, 2015 11:45PM
I've often considered getting a 140 Atoma for absolutely no other reason than reconditioning my Norton virtified bond stones. It seems like a very good option aside from the price.
Re: Atoma 140
September 17, 2015 03:02AM
Quote
Ryan Nafe
I've often considered getting a 140 Atoma for absolutely no other reason than reconditioning my Norton virtified bond stones. It seems like a very good option aside from the price.

Does this work well without damaging the plate in the process?
Re: Atoma 140
September 17, 2015 04:02AM
I have absolutely no idea
Re: Atoma 140
November 13, 2015 02:08PM
So, I recently acquired one of these stones… upon receipt I must say I am vey impressed with it. Very nicely machined, the diamond matrix is definitely stunning to behold in person.

Down to the nitty gritty though, I was given a pretty fair price on this and I mostly bought this for something that could do rougher grinding such as primary bevels. That being said, I am having second thoughts as to whether it would be well suited for this.

I will mainly be planing down full convex primary grinds with it, so total force is a concern for me as to fracturing the diamonds and ruining the plate in the process. Any thoughts here?
Re: Atoma 140
November 13, 2015 03:05PM
I wouldn't use it for grinding the primary, they work best for grinding edge bevels, with light force. For the primary, I would use a TASK or similar stone, or low grit AlO paper or low grit Wet/Dry SiC paper

"I am still discussing issues of steels and performance at this stage." -- Cliff Stamp, May his memory be a blessing
"Life is GOOD", -- Stefan_Wolf, May His Memory Be A Blessing
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Re: Atoma 140
November 13, 2015 03:09PM
Jason, do you have a particular reason against using it for primary? Could it be used if needed with low force, for something like higher carbide steels?
Re: Atoma 140
November 13, 2015 03:10PM
Nothingman,

Having used an Atoma 140, coarse India and coarse Crystolon for thinning out primary grinds, I would go with the Crystolon for the job hands down. It is the coarsest of the three at ~90 grit and readily releases fresh abrasive under the low pressures generated when grinding large surface areas. In my experience it is quite noticeably faster than an Atoma 140 for the task.
Re: Atoma 140
November 13, 2015 03:29PM
Nothingman-
Because you can't use any pressure, and there is no abrasive being released, plus what SD said.
Try it out, try zero grinding some cheap paring knives.
Also, the diamond hones are expensive, I have some that are close to 20 years old, but you have to use them carefully so you don't kill them. I have only killed one diamond hone, and that was a cheap pocket rod hone, and just the increased pressure from it being a rod killed it within a year of light use, and I have a EZE-Lap model that's similar, but bettermade, and was that lasted to this day, from the late '90's or early 2000's, although it is showing a little wear in places.

"I am still discussing issues of steels and performance at this stage." -- Cliff Stamp, May his memory be a blessing
"Life is GOOD", -- Stefan_Wolf, May His Memory Be A Blessing
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Re: Atoma 140
January 11, 2016 01:30PM
I can't really find a use for mine but it does look awesome. Expensive toy.
Re: Atoma 140
January 12, 2016 03:36AM
Like a dummy I bought the 140, 400 and 1200 grit Atomas. Tried them a few times. I had rather use DMTs.
Re: Atoma 140
January 12, 2016 03:44AM
Odd, I've heard good things about the Atoma, What exactly did you not like about them?
Re: Atoma 140
January 12, 2016 05:49AM
It's not so much that I don't like them, it's that I haven't found a reason to think they are anything special. In the higher grit DMTs you have issues with outsize grain. That's not such a problem for me. I generally stop at 600. My DMTs were a little rough at first. I have them all broken in now, so even the 1200 is not much of an issue. For some reason, the Atomas grit size seems larger than the DMTs, grit for grit. In other words, the 1200 Atoma grit leaves a rougher edge than the 1200 DMT. The other thing is that the Atomas are so much more expensive than DMTs. I guess, subconsciously, I am saving them for something special, like TEOTWAWKI, LOL. I wouldn't want to discourage anyone for buying the Atomas. They are nice, just too expensive for me to use them regularly.
Re: Atoma 140
January 13, 2016 12:42AM
Larry: You raise a pretty interesting point.

I like diamond stones a lot, but beyond 600 grit I am not really sure they are worth the hassle, nor are they suitable for doing heavy metal removal. Now yeah, Atoma's don't have the same issues that DMT has at high grits, but there are other stones that can provide a high grit finish with less effort and expense.

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Bill22252 on YouTube. "See you space cowboy"

Resident Emerson Fanboi

Folding knives are fun, fixed blades are important.